Communicating Contentious Politics: Social Movements and Networked Communication in the Arab World

Thursday November 30, 2017

Interest in social movements in the Arab World piqued following the so-called Arab Spring and heralded a series of publications, some of which focused exclusively on the digital media. While the digital media has certainly allowed civil society “to survive, deliberate, coordinate and expand” as Manuel Castells succinctly put it, focusing exclusively on cyberspace is wholly inadequate as it overlooks socio-political factors, displaces agency and overlooks other forms of communication from the traditional media to interpersonal communication.

This project will bring together scholars working in the fields of networked communication and social movement research in both Lebanon and the region. Papers will probe the public self-representation of these movements, the manner in which they frame their claims, communicate with the polity, and how they are perceived. This project will also look at both contemporary and historical movements ranging from the communicative strategies of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and the workers’ movement in pre-civil war Lebanon to the “hashtagable” You Stink movement that erupted in Lebanon in 2015.

CLS Academic Visitor At St Antony’s (2016-2017)

The Centre for Lebanese Studies (CLS) is offering support for applications to be an Academic Visitor at St Antony’s College for the 2016-2017 academic year.

Those wishing to apply for support should be scholars of Lebanon with an established record of academic excellence, normally holding the Ph.D. or equivalent. Current students are not eligible to apply. Such scholars should be engaged in research in either the humanities or social sciences, on a topic of relevance to modern Lebanon (19th century to present day) and must demonstrate sufficient command of English to take full advantage of and contribute to the academic life of Oxford University.

Academic Visitors are members of St Antony’s College for the duration of their affiliation. The CLS offers to fund the fee for membership of St Antony’s College for the academic year 2016-2017, in addition to eight High Table dinners at St Antony’s per term. The academic visitorship does not provide a stipend or maintenance. The person appointed would need to meet their own expenses. 

The CLS expects applicants it supports to promote knowledge, and scholarship on Lebanon through individual research and public lectures. The Academic Visitor supported by the CLS would normally organize a workshop or conference related to the subject of their research in the course of their affiliation, in cooperation with the Middle East Centre and the Centre for Lebanese Studies. The person appointed may be asked to assist in limited supervision of masters and doctoral students working on Lebanon.

INVITATION: Project Launch “Developing History Teachers’ Capacity to Foster Historical Thinking

The Lebanese Association for History

in collaboration with
the Embassy of the Kingdom of Netherlands,
                       the Center for Applied Research in Education at Notre Dame University-Louaize,              
and the Centre for Lebanese Studies
has the pleasure of inviting you to the launching of
 
« Developing History Teachers’ Capacity to Foster Historical Thinking »
that provides a one year intensive training  by international experts, support sessions by LAH team,
and peer mentoring to support history teachers in promoting historical thinking in classrooms

 

The ceremony will take place in the presence of training leaders
Dr. Arthur Chapman and Mrs. Christine Counsell
 on Friday, January 30th, 2015 from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m.,      
at Notre Dame UniversityLouaize, Zouk Mosbeh, Friends Hall
 
Please join us at the reception that will follow the launch ceremony.
 
 
 
الهيئة اللبنانية للتاريخ
بالتعاون مع
سفارة مملكة البلاد المنخفضة
 ومركز البحوث التطبيقيّة في التربية في جامعة سيّدة اللويزة
 ومركز الدراسات اللبنانية

 تتشرّف بدعوتكم لحضور حفل اطلاق البرنامج التدريبي

 تطوير قدرة معلّمي التاريخ على تنمية التفكير التاريخي”

 الذي يشمل تدريباً مكثفاً من قبل أخصائيين عالميين، جلسات الدعم من قبل أعضاء الهيئة،
ودعم الأقران لمساندة المعلّمين في تنمية التفكير التاريخي في صفوف التاريخ

 

يجري الحفل بحضور المدرّبين الرئيسيين
د. آرثر شابمان والسيدة وكريستين كاونسيل
  وذلك يوم الجمعة في 30 كانون الثاني 2015 من الساعة الخامسة حتى السادسة من بعد الظهر في حرم جامعة سيّدة اللويزة، زوق مصبح، قاعة الأصدقاء
 
نتمنى مشاركتكم في الكوكتيل الذي يلي حفل اطلاق المشروع. 

“Towards a Responsible and Disciplinary Approach to History Education in the Mediterranean Region”

The Lebanese Association for History, EUROCLIO, and Notre Dame University

In collaboration with the Centre for Lebanese Studies and the Finnish Institute in the Middle East cordially invites you to a workshop

Towards a responsible and disciplinary approach to history education in the Mediterranean Region –
Empowering educators to use multi-perspective approaches and historical thinking concepts in the history classroom

May 3-6 2014

The seminar will be hosted by Notre-Dame University (NDU) and will involve 30 participants coming from 5 Arab countries (Lebanon, Palestine, Jordan, Tunisia and Morocco).
It will focus on historical concepts, multinarrative history teaching, and the use of information technology in the history classroom. It will include sessions on the role and the administration of NGOs.

EUROCLIO-LAH Workshop May 2014 Final Programme

Book launch: Rethinking Education for Social Cohesion: International Case Studies on Thursday, February 7, 2013

Center for Lebanese Studies

and

Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs

and the

 Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Media Studies (AUB)

cordially invite you to the book launch of 

Rethinking Education for Social Cohesion: International Case Studies

Editor: Maha Shuayb (2012) Palgrave Macmillan

Including a panel and open discussion with

Maha Shuayb,Dina Kiwan & Mark Farha

Thursday,  February 7, 2013 | 17:00 – 18:30 pm | College Hall, Auditorium B1, AUB

_______________________________________________ The book is the product of a conference organized by the Centre for Lebanese Studies, University of Oxford and hosted by the Issam Fares Institute that took place at the AUB in October 2009.  Maha Shuayb(PHD), Director of Centre for Lebanese Studies Dina Kiwan (PHD), Associate professor, Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Media Studies,American University of Beirut, Mark Farha (PHD),Associate professor, Georgetown University, Doha, Qatar. _______________________________________________ This book offers a critical analysis of the theories underpinning the current approaches and practices of social cohesion. The contributions examine the ethics and policy making of social cohesion, critiquing the nationalistic and economic driven objectives which dominate the field to propose a multi-dimensional approach underpinned by social justice and care. Exploring the challenges encountered by policy makers in reforming education to promote social cohesion, the book also tackles some of the main debates regarding the role of faith and private schools in hindering or promoting social cohesion and presents case studies from around the globe that demonstrate different countries’ attempts to promote social cohesion. The book also investigates the effectiveness of some of the current approaches proposed to promote social cohesion including human right education and citizenship and history education. Contributing Authors: Hugh Starkey, Richard Pring, Dina Kiwan, Mark Farha, Mounir Abou Assali
, Nemer Frayha, 
 Tony Breslin, Bassel Akar,
 Lee Jerome,  Andy McCallum,
 Roccia García Carrión,  Alexandra Asseily, Souraya Ali,  and Tatiana.Minkina-Milko. Note: Event will be in English  

New Publication: Rethinking Education for Social Cohesion: International Case Studies

New Publication.
Rethinking Education for Social Cohesion: International Case Studies.
Editor: Maha Shuayb.

Special launch price, order now and pay half price – £ 27.50 until February 2013. To order your copy at this special price, visit www.palgrave.com and quote discount code WSOCIAL2012a, or email order to orders@palgrave.com

Alternatively use the PDF Order Form to order your book and pay half price – £27.50.

This book offers a critical analysis of the theories underpinning the current approaches and practices of social cohesion. The contributions examine the ethics and policy making of social cohesion, critiquing the nationalistic and economic driven objectives which dominate the field to propose a multi-dimensional approach underpinned by social justice and care. Exploring the challenges encountered by policy makers in reforming education to promote social cohesion, the book also tackles some of the main debates regarding the role of faith and private schools in hindering or promoting social cohesion and presents case studies from around the globe that demonstrate different countries’ attempts to promote social cohesion. The book also investigates the effectiveness of some of the current approaches proposed to promote social cohesion including human right education and citizenship and history education.

Contributing Authors:
Hugh Starkey, Richard Pring, Dina Kiwa, Mark Farha, Mounir Abou Assali
, Nemer Frayha, 
 Tony Breslin, Bassel Akar,
 Lee Jerome, Andy McCallum,
 Roccia García Carrión, Alexandra Asseily, Souraya Ali, and Tatiana.Minkina-Milko

Historical thinking: An approach for teaching history in conflict areas:
Lessons from the Greek Cypriot -Turkish Cypriot experience

20 October 2012
College Hall, Auditorium B
American University of Beirut

Time: 8.30am – 2.30pm

The Centre for Lebanese Studies, at St Antony’s College, Oxford University and the Lebanese Association for Educational Studies, in collaboration with the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Media Studies at the American University of Beirut, cordially invite you to attend a workshop on the Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot experience in adopting a Historical Thinking approach to learning and teaching history in a context of conflicting and controversial historical narratives. The workshop also aims to examine Historical Thinking as an approach for the learning and teaching of history in Lebanon, a post-conflict community with multiple narratives.

Historical Thinking, like scientific thinking in science instruction, is central to history instruction and that students should become more competent as historical thinkers. By thinking historically, one can critically discuss with others about causes and consequences, change and continuity, interpretation, significance, differences and similarities and chronological understanding of historical incident. The workshop will explore the following questions: how can we, as educators, transform our history education classrooms to encourage students to think historically? What challenges do we face and how can we address them?

Attendance is free and places are limited.
To register, please contact the following number 01-744222 or send the attached registration card to the email address; info@lebanesestudies.com before 15th of October 2012.

Registration forms:

PDF Arabic 
DOC Arabic

PDF English
DOC English

Rethinking Education for Social Cohesion: International case studies.

  This book offers a critical analysis of the theories underpinning the current approaches and practices of social cohesion. The contributions examine the ethics and policy making of social cohesion, critiquing the nationalistic and economic driven objectives which dominate the field to propose a multi-dimensional approach underpinned by social justice and care. Exploring the challenges encountered by policy makers in reforming education to promote social cohesion, the book also tackles some of the main debates regarding the role of faith and private schools in hindering or promoting social cohesion and presents case studies from around the globe that demonstrate different countries’ attempts to promote social cohesion. The book also investigates the effectiveness of some of the current approaches proposed to promote social cohesion including human right education and citizenship and history education. Table of Contents: Foreword Acknowledgements Abbreviations Notes on Contributors Introduction; M.Shuayb PART I: THE THEORY AND POLITICS OF SOCIAL COHESION From Social Cohesion to Social Justice and Care in Education: Re-visiting the Theory and Practice; M.Shuayb Education, Social Cohesion and Human Rights; H.Starkey Multicultural Citizenship and Social Cohesion: Reflecting on the Case Study of England; D.Kiwan The Historical Legacy and Political Implications of State and Sectarian Schools in Lebanon; M.Farha Education for Social Cohesion in Lebanon: The Educational Reform Experiment in the Wake of the Lebanese War; M.Abou Assali Education as a Basic Means in Building Societal Cohesion in Lebanon: An Unfinished Task; N.Frayha Common School or Common System? R.Pring PART II: MEANS FOR PROMOTING SOCIAL COHESION: EVIDENCE FROM THE FIELD Building Social Inclusion and Community Cohesion: The Role of the Citizenship-rich School; T.Breslin Current Models and Approaches to Social Cohesion in Secondary Schools in Lebanon; M.Shuayb Civics Re-examined: The Gap Between Civic Education and Active Citizenship in Lebanon; B.Akar Promoting a Rights-based Perspective in Initial Teacher Education; L.Jerome & A.McCallum Achieving Social Cohesion in Europe through Education: A Success Story; R.García Carrión School Linking as a means of Fostering Community Cohesion; S.Ali The Power of Language: How Small Shifts in Language Create Big Shifts in Relationships and Behaviour: A Guide for Teachers, Students, Leaders and Parents; A.Asseily Teaching and Learning History for Strengthening Reconciliation and Peace Building Process: Experience of the Council of Europe; T.Minkina-Milko Conclusion; M.Shuayb Index

Education for Social Cohesion

In 2009 the Centre launched a project aimed at piloting the impact of adopting a whole school approach to social cohesion and citizenship education on young people’s political and civic attitudes.  In Lebanon, the current and most predominant approach to citizenship education relies on teaching civics one hour per week.  However, research showed that this approach has a limited effect in tackling sectarianism and developing young people’s active citizenship skills. A survey of 900 Lebanese high school students conducted by the Centre for Lebanese Studies in 2009 revealed that sectarianism is heavily engrained amongst young Lebanese students. 64% would always trust Lebanese from their sect while a similar percentage would rarely or never trust Lebanese from other sects.

Although the consecutive governments placed a huge emphasis on citizenship education, the pedagogies currently implemented in many public schools are still didactic. The emphasis appears to be on acquiring knowledge while limited opportunities are provided to students to develop their civic skills.  Moreover, the undemocratic school environment contradicts the ethos taught in civic education.

This project aims to:

• Promote active citizenship education and behaviours by focusing on developing students’ competencies, skills and attitudes.

• Foster a supportive, democratic, and cohesive school environment that encourages participation and empowers the whole school community.

• Assess and monitor the impact of this approach on young people’s political, civic, and social attitudes, knowledge and skills.

For further information please contact Dr Maha Shuayb (ms455@cam.ac.uk)

CLS education for social cohesion project announcement

Project Overview

A Whole School Approach to Active Citizenship Education and Social Cohesion

The project aims to support schools in promoting active citizenship, and social cohesion through a sustainable and holistic educational programme that emphasizes critical pedagogies, democratic practices at school, and strong school/community relationships.

This educational programme is proposed as an alternative to the didactic and knowledge-based citizenship educational model currently adopted in many schools, which research revealed has failed to address sectarianism and promote social cohesion.

The project will be designed with and implemented in selected schools in the private and public sectors.
The outcomes of the pilot project will provide insight into the potentials and challenges of implementing a holistic, active and participative curriculum focused on promoting social cohesion and active citizenship in Lebanon.

November 11-13, 2011, Upcoming Conference at LAU Byblos.

 
On ‘Healing the wounds of history’.

The CLS is currently planning an international conference entitled ‘Healing the Wounds of History: Addressing Roots of Violence’ to be held on 11-13 November 2011 in Byblos, Lebanon. A collaboration between the CLS, the Guerrand-Hermes Foundation for Peace and the Lebanese American University.

Please refer to the Conference Concept Paper.

July 2011 CLS Newsletter

Features updates about the recent workshop and the research team at the Centre for Lebanese Studies.

Please refer to the Centre for Lebanese Studies Newsletter.

Socio-political Change in Lebanon after 2005

 

Social and Political Change in the Aftermath of the 2005 Hariri Assassination: Implications for Everyday Life in Lebanon
May 20, 2011

Introductions and Welcome Remarks: George Asseily, Centre for Lebanese Studies; Luc Borot, Maison Francaise d’Oxford Lebanese Political Parties and the Politics of Sectarianism

Bernard Rougier Syria and Sunni Lebanon After 2005: Stakes and Levers

Aurelie Daher Hezbollah as a Political Actor since Rafic Hariri’s Assassination

Joseph Bahout Istiqlâl after ihbât? Christian New-Old Dilemmas

Lebanon’s Public Life and Institutions: Reflections on Politics in Society

Sami Hermez Living Everyday in Anticipation of Violence in Lebanon

Heiko Wimmen Civic Activism and Non-Sectarian Citizenship:Lebanon 1996-2011

Muzna Al-Masri Hariri and the Patronage of Nejmeh Football Club: Changing the Players or the Game?

Michelle Obeid Discussant

Keynote Speaker
Theodor Hanf, University of Freiburg & American Uni. Of Beirut
“How Resilient is Lebanese Communalism?”

Sponsors:
Centre for Lebanese Studies; Middle East Centre; Maison Francaise d’Oxford, Oxford-
Sciences PO Research Group
For more information contact Sami Hermez at sami.hermez@sant.ox.ac.uk or Aurelie Daher at
aurelie.daher@politics.ox.ac.uk

Workshop at St Antony’s College.

 
On Social and Political Change in Lebanon.

‘Social and Political Change in the Aftermath of the 2005 Hariri Assassination: Implications for Everyday Life in Lebanon’, One-day workshop. 10:30am to 6pm, organized by CLS fellow Sami Hermez – St. Antony’s College, Oxford University.

Please refer to the Conference Programme.

Middle East Centre, Manchester University, ‘The War is Coming: Living Everyday Life in Anticipation of Violence in Lebanon’, Talk by CLS fellow Sami Hermez

‘Is Lebanon Reformable?’, Nadim Houry

Nadim Houry is Human Rights Watch’s senior researcher for Lebanon and Syria and the director of the Beirut office. His talk entitled ‘Is Lebanon Reformable?’. In the course of his work Nadim has documented violations of international humanitarian law during the July 2006 war between Israel and Hezbollah. He has also researched human rights violations affecting vulnerable groups in Lebanon such as migrant domestic workers, Iraqi and Palestinian refugees, victims of enforced disappearances and Lebanese detainees in Syria. His work on Syria focuses mostly on arrests of activists and restrictions on freedom of expression. Prior to joining Human Rights Watch, Nadim served as Deputy Counsel for the Volcker Commission, where he spent over a year conducting fact-finding missions in the Middle East to unearth the facts of the UN’s prominent corruption inquiry into the Oil-for-Food Programme. An attorney by training, Nadim worked as a corporate lawyer for Shearman & Sterling in New York for the two years prior to his work at the Volcker Commission.

Notre Dame University, ‘Education in Lebanon: Toward More Sectarianism and Conflict? The Role of Faith and Secular Schools’, Talk by CLS fellow Dr. Maha Shuayb

CLS fellow at University of Cambridge, Dr Maha Shuayb, gave a talk at Notre Dame University on the 28th of March entitled ‘Education in Lebanon: Toward More Sectarianism and Conflict? The Role of Faith and Secular Schools’.

History Education: a lesson from Lebanon and to Lebanon’, Presentation of the study

The CLS research team presented the findings of their study of history education in Lebanon. The research findings were presented at a conference organised by the Lebanese Association for Educational Research entitled ‘History Education: a lesson from Lebanon and to Lebanon’ which took place on the 24th and 25th of March in Rivera Hotel, Beirut. The team consisting of Dr Maha Shuayb, Nisrine Makouk, Dr Bassel Akar and Walid Hashisho delivered a presentation entitled: ‘History Education in Lebanon: from brainwashing and pacifying to empowering students’. The team carried out a comparative study which examined the impact of two different approaches to teaching history: the first emphasizes a content knowledge and didactic approach to history teaching and is practiced in the majority of Lebanese schools. The second approach adopts an inquiry and skills based approach to learning history. The comparative study examined the impact of these two approaches on students’ motivation, engagement, perception to history education, and ability to develop their analytical skills.

Education for social cohesion project’ – Strategy Planning day

Part of the ‘Education for social cohesion project’, a strategy planning day took place on the 21st of March. The event aimed at designing a plan for addressing the main challenges encountered by teachers at a public school. The event was designed and delivered by the ‘extra-curricular committee’ at the school, headed by Ms Fatema Bazi. Despite the absence of any incentives by the Ministry of Education, teachers in this public school used their own personal time to think of ways to develop their school’s performance. Implementation of the plan will be supported by the teaching and learning committee recently developed at the school and the extra-curricular committee at the school.

Was Beirut a Levantine City, and is it still?

Dr. Mansel, who made his reputation as a historian and authority on nineteenth century France, and later wrote two excellent works on Constantinople and the Ottoman Empire, has very recently published a highly acclaimed book entitled ‘Levant: Splendour and Catastrophe on the Mediterranean’ where the Levant is seen through the history of three key cities, Smyrna (now Izmir), Alexandria and Beirut. The book examines the ways in which these Levantine cities which sat on the frontline between the Ottoman Empire and Europe reflected dialogues between East and West, and challenged stereotypes about cosmopolitanism, coexistence and nationalism, by allowing all of them to flourish. In their review of ‘Levant’, the Sunday Telegraph said ‘the strengths of the book are colossal’, while the Financial Times writer said ‘he could scarcely put down this magnificent book’. The Economist called it ‘a highly enjoyable and intricately worked account of three great Mediterranean ports’. Finally Patrick Seale appearing on the BBC said the book was ‘eloquent and moving… a song of lamentation for a lost cosmopolitan world’. While writing ‘Levant’ Philip Mansel lived in Beirut and Istanbul. He also writes for the Spectator and the Times Literary Supplement.

How Lebanon Mirrors the Middle East: Gridlock, Conflict or Consensus?

Rami’s appointment in 2005 as the Director of the Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs at the American University of Beirut follows a long career in journalism in the Middle East, especially in Jordan and Lebanon where he still serves as editor at large of the Beirut- based Daily Star newspaper. His journalistic work includes an internationally syndicated column and he has also written for the Financial Times, the Boston Globe and the Washington Post. In 2001-2002 he spent the academic year as a Nieman Journalism Fellow at Harvard University and was appointed a member of the Brookings Institute Task Force on US Relations with the Islamic World. He is a research associate at the Program on the Analysis of Resolution of Conflict at the Maxwell School, Syracuse University, and a member of the Leadership Council of the Harvard University Divinity School. He also serves on the board of the East-West Institute, the Centre for Contemporary Arab Studies at Georgetown University. He often comments on Mideast issues in the international media and lectures frequently at conferences and universities throughout the world.